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Story of Hope

I was floored when I was given the diagnosis,” says Jordan who has a Masters in Health Sciences and works as a counselor for people with HIV and AIDS as well as people recovering from addictions. Read how Debra Jordan learned she had Hepatitis C.

Debra Jordan

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Home > Divisions > Hepatitis Awareness Month > Hepatitis Risk Assessment Surveys

Are You at Risk for Hepatitis?

Did you know you can take action to prevent hepatitis? The American Liver Foundation (ALF) is dedicated to facilitating, advocating, and promoting education, support and research for the prevention, treatment and cure of liver disease.

What is Hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused by the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV). HBV causes the liver to swell and prevents it from working well. HBV is passed from person to person through bodily fluids (blood, semen, and vaginal secretions). It is most often it is transmitted through sexual contact or from an infected mother to her infant during birth. There is a vaccine for HBV.

HBV is acute or short-term for about 95% of adults and chronic (or long-term) for about 5%. Acute HBV usually goes away on its own within six months. There is available treatment for chronic hepatitis B and symptoms can be managed.

What is Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). HCV causes the liver to swell and prevents it from working well. HCV is passed from person to person by blood. It is most often transmitted when a person’s blood comes into direct contact with infected blood. There is no vaccine for HCV.

HCV is acute or short-term for about 15% of people and chronic (or long-term) for about 85%. Acute HCV usually goes away on its own within six months. There is available treatment for chronic hepatitis C and symptoms can be managed.

Are You at Risk?

Hepatitis B Risk Assessment
If you have any of the risk factors indicated below talk to your healthcare provider about getting tested for hepatitis B.

  • Were born to an HBV-infected mother
  • Have ever worked with or come in contact with infected bodily fluids
  • Have ever had unprotected sex with an HBV-infected person
  • Have ever had multiple sexual partners
  • Have ever had a sexually transmitted disease
  • Are a man who has sex with men
  • Have ever injected or inhaled drugs (even if it was only once or many years ago)
  • Have ever received hemodialysis (used equipment that cleans blood)
  • Have ever worked or been housed in a prison
  • Have ever traveled to countries where HBV is common
  • Have ever had tattoos or body piercings

Hepititis C Risk Assessment
If you have any of the risk factors indicated below talk to your healthcare provider about getting tested for hepatitis C.

  • Have ever injected or inhaled drugs (even if it was only once or many years ago)
  • Have ever received a blood clotting factor before 1987
  • Have ever received a blood transfusion or transplant before July 1992
  • Have ever received hemodialysis (used equipment that cleans blood)
  • Have had abnormal ALT (type of liver enzyme) levels several times on blood test results
  • Have ever worked or come in contact with infected needles or blood
  • Were born to an HCV-infected mother
  • Have HIV
  • Have ever worked or been housed in a prison
  • Have ever had unprotected sex with multiple partners
  • Have ever had a sexually transmitted disease
  • Have ever had tattoos or body piercings